Oliver Aldort age 13 Oliver Aldort 2012

Oliver Aldort

"The immediate impression of the listener
is one of complete astonishment.”

- La Presse, Montreal

2011 News & Reviews

August 11, 2011

Oliver Aldort was one of two young musicians featured in an article in The Berskhire Eagle entitled Cello and bassoon absorbed in melody, a discussion of the prodigious musical talents that are currently awing audiences at the Tanglewood Music Center.

June 3, 2011

On May 21st Oliver played a cello recital in Miami Beach as part of the Miami International Piano Festival. You can watch part of it, the Chopin Sonata complete, on YouTube:

His March 8th recital in Ft Lauderdale is on his site www.OliverAldort.com

Oliver has decided to move on from Colburn school to Curtis. He will start his studies at the Curtis Institute of Music this coming fall. He will study with both cello teachers, Carter Brey and Peter Wiley. He will also have available to him the study of conducting, piano, voice, opera and other music passions of his which were not available at Colburn.

For the summer, Oliver was accepted (even though under age) to the Tanglewood summer festival program and will be performing there both chamber and orchestral music.

May 3, 2011

Oliver entered Colburn Conservatory of Music in August and I have not sent any emails about his performances since. Also, since I am not in LA, only one of his performances was filmed. In this email you will find a link to the newest video, and for Oliver’s next week recital and collaboration.

Oliver has performed recently as part of NYSOS in Carnegie Hall, in two concerts over Christmas (Yoyo Ma performed in that orchestra as a youth as well.) He a bright star at Colburn and often asked to play for donors.

Oliver is giving a concert and collaborating with professionals in Miami next week. And, last night the one video of Chopin Polonaise Brilliant was finally put on youtube. It was recorded on Sep. 30th 2010. Oliver was sixteen. He is now a fresh seventeen.

Here is the information for the video and the coming up concert:

1) Chopin video: Make sure you see this one and not the one that was put by TED (which is horrible sound recording quality.) However for those of you interested, the TED video talks about Oliver with some photos in the first one minute.

Here is the new video from Colburn:

It will soon be on Oliver’s site too, with the other videos of his cello, conducting and piano that are already on his home page.

2) Miami chamber music concert: Oliver was hired to replace Cleveland Orchestra’s principal cellist, in a collaborative chamber concert in Miami. Then another player became ill and Oliver, two weeks before the concert, was asked to fill the first part of the concert with a solo recital and then play the planned Dvorak piano quintet in the second part. He accepted.

Here is the information:

Cellist Oliver Aldort, recently featured in the "World's Greatest Musical Prodigies" on WLRN will join pianist Ilya Itin for the first half of the program:

Beethoven - Cello Sonata in D Op 102
Schumann - Adagio & Allegro Op. 70
Chopin - Polonaise Brillante Op. 9

The second half welcomes (3) members of the Amernet Quartet performing Dvorák's sublime Piano Quintet in A Major, with Oliver Aldort on the cello.

The concert takes place at the Broward center’s Amateur Theater. Tickets information: http://www.browardcenter.org/mipfchambermasters

We the parents, will not be at this concert. If you will, or if you know someone in the Miami area who would enjoy the concert, I would love to hear from you or them about it.



2009 News & Reviews

Oliver Aldort: Astonishment
Claude Gingras, La Presse

For the moment, the question is not whether Oliver Aldort is a great pianist or a great cellist. Based on what we heard yesterday afternoon, this 15 year old boy from Seattle, doesn’t have to worry about his future whether he chooses the piano or the cello.

The immediate impression of the listener is one of complete astonishment. With a piano he wasn’t familiar with (it was his first contact with a Bösendorfer) and with a cello he borrowed from a colleague from Ottawa (to minimize the cost of transportation), the young Aldort played an hour and a half of completely memorized music, showing an absolute mastery of both instruments and above all a focus, a musicality and a maturity that were not those of a beginner but of an experienced interpreter instead. All this at only 15 years of age From the technical point of view, there are almost no negative things to point out. No wrong notes on the piano part, and almost a lapse of memory (note almost), and a couple slight squeaks from the cello (remember that it wasn’t his cello). Whether he is playing the piano or the cello, the young Aldort reach the instrument musical capacities, exploiting every note from the lowest to the hightest.

From the entire program, I most remember the exceptional unity that he gives to the fifth Suite for Solo Cello by Bach and the independence/autonomy? of both of his hands which gives so much contrasts to the first movement of the Sonata Op 111 by Beethoven. I would also like to commend the young Yen-Yen Gee for her impeccable playing especially in the Schubert’s Arpeggione.

The event drew a hundred people - a sunny Father’s Day afternoon. There were two encores: a Mendelssohn and a Chopin. This recital opened the new Revelation concert series by Daniel Poulin.

OLIVER ALDORT, pianist and cellist. At the piano: Yen-Yen Gee. Yesterday afternoon, Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur. Presentation: Revelation.

-Pierre Suignard

 

The greatest musical prodigies, UK, national TV, articles and reactions:

An email from one of the two professional advisons:

Dear Naomi:

I have watched the program again and Oliver's playing is riveting, the true musicians of the world know that, make no mistake.

I am relieved that the reaction to the film is so wonderful and Alex problems are so obvious, he was terribly intimidated by Oliver's musical power.

Giselle Brodsky

Email to Ms. Brodsky

Dear Giselle,

Having just watched 'The World's Greatest Prodigies' on Channel 4 in the UK, I am writing to express my amazement at Alexander Prior's arrogance and total lack of musical discernment concerning the playing of young Oliver. I normally do not write emails like this, but it was obvious to us that Oliver was by far the most sensitive and wonderfully expressive musician auditioning. I was appalled at the way he was treated by that rather objectionable young composer. Please tell him to pay no attention to the young upstart; Oliver has a wonderful understanding of the composer's intentions and communicates this brilliantly to the audience.

Best wishes,

Deborah Davies M.A.(Mus.Psych.); ARCM (Organ playing); Dip.Mus.Tch.; B.Ed; music teacher, organist, conductor of choirs and orchestras.

Geoffrey Davies Mus.Doc; LRAM...............Professional bass soloist, music teacher, conductor.

Channel 4 TV comments:

ETRUSCA on June 9, 2009 at 10:21

Thank you for this programme. All the children were extremely good. The harpist was an amazing young musician, but the name I will certainly remember from the first part of the series is that of Oliver Aldort, who may easily become a new Rostropovich. Sadly, Alex Prior did not recognize his opportunity to compose for potentially the greatest cellist of the 21st century.

PythagoreanX has posted a comment on your profile:

I watched Channel4's program (in the UK) called 'The World's Greatest Musical Prodigies'. You (Oliver) were emotionally engaged and was the best player in the program. Forget about Alex, the young composer from UK, who put you down with the mean comments. He can't see, or don't wanna see that you are a true musician.

A quote from an article in "The Independent" in UK:

"You don't communicate," he tells the most outstanding cellist, Oliver Aldort, while explaining to his shocked advisers that his reason for not selecting another player is that "he is not charming".

 

Other Comments:

"Oliver is unquestionably the finest young cello talent I've encountered. His preternatural technical command is nothing short of breath-taking. But it is the emotional breadth of his refined lyricism and astounding musical maturity which sets him apart from all other performers, whether prodigies or seasoned professionals. His uncontrived music-making bespeaks a singular sincerity which will most assuredly move and inspire audiences for years to come. I feel privileged to have heard him. "

- Robert Bardston, Cellist
Medicine Hat College
Canada

"This is a remarkable talent, the likes of which we may hear only once in a lifetime."

- Prof. Talmon Hertz from the University of Calgary
in a phone message to a colleague; Prof. Hertz is the head of the International committee for chamber music throughout the world

Oliver's ensemble work is excellent -- he listens, he responds and is musically informed.

- Willard Schultz, Pianist, Seattle WA